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Mentoring Programme

The word mentor originated from Homer's Odyssey thousands of years ago. Today, the word mentor has evolved to mean a trusted friend, savvy advisor, excellent teacher, and wise person. As an alumnus of CEIBS and part of the CEIBS mentoring programme, we are confident that you will exceed these standards as a mentor to our MBA students.

Since launching in 2004, the CEIBS Mentoring Programme has benefited more than 1,700 mentors and mentees. It is designed to provide current MBA students with valuable advice beyond the classroom in order to help them grow and develop as a business professional. As a mentor, you will impart valuable knowledge, offer guidance, share experiences, and suggest ways the student can develop. The Mentoring Programme will be integrated with a required academic course — the MBA Leadership Journey — in order to integrate classroom learning with practical experiences from the field.

To help and guide our MBA students, you can participate in the following ways:

1. Choose to directly mentor one to three MBA students
2. Share your experiences with students through a lecture format

2017-2018 Mentoring Programme Mentor Recruitment begins July 7th, and you are welcome to join us! (Mentor Guide for your reference.)

New Mentor Registration, please click here.

Experienced Mentor, please click here to activate your account and update your information.


Prof. Emily David's 10 Tips for Being a Good Mentor

1. Even if it seems awkward to be so direct, use the very first meeting to outline your expectations of each other and how you will work together. Define acceptable conversation topics, behaviors, and, most importantly, what you both hope to get out of the partnership.
2. Give your mentee specific times that he or she can contact you as well as acceptable modes (e.g., email, WeChat, phone calls).
3. Set ground rules for meetings. Good practices are to (a) go in with a predetermined agenda or topic, (b) agree to both give your undivided attention while together, and (c) give them developmental next steps or action plans to work on after the meeting is over. more

Stories of Mentors and Mentees