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Wednesday, November 28, 2018

3rd Annual CEIBS OB/HR Symposium -- Leading for Change: Promoting Proactivity, Employee Voice, and Creative Performance

3rd Annual CEIBS OB/HR Symposium
Leading for Change :
Promoting Proactivity, Employee Voice, and Creative Performance

The OB/HR CEIBS Symposium is intended as a forum for academics to discuss their newest research in organisational behaviour and human resource management topics. This year we will gain insight into how leaders succeed by promoting three change-oriented outcomes: proactivity, creativity, and employee voice.

Presenters are individuals who are on the cutting-edge of research in our field and whose work represents creative and high-quality scholarship. We strive to keep the conference numbers small and provide an intimate setting to foster collaborative ties and a supportive atmosphere.

There is no registration fee for this symposium. However, attendance is limited to 150 people due to space restrictions. Preference will be given to Faculty for this symposium on a first come, first served basis via the following website:

Online Registration

Date: November 28, 2018

Time: The symposium will begin with registration at 8:30 a.m. and finish at 5:00 p.m.

Schedule:

8:30 a.m.

Registration and Breakfast

9:00-9:10 a.m.

Opening address by Prof. Weijiong Zhang, Vice President and Co-Dean, CEIBS
Welcome by Prof. Tae-Yeol Kim, Chair of OB/HR Dept

9:10-10:50 a.m.

Leading for Proactivity
Chair: Sebastian Schuh (CEIBS)
Sharon K. Parker (Curtin University)

Leading for proactivity and wise proactivity: Some findings and new directions
Wu Liu (Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
Some anger works, some anger hurts: Leader’s display of anger and employee proactive behaviour
Discussant: Zhijun Chen (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

10:50-11:05 a.m.

Break

11:05-12:30 p.m.

Leading for Employee Voice
Chair: Byron Lee (CEIBS)
Troy A. Smith (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

A follower-centric perspective on empowering leadership: The role of employee voice
Jian Liang (Tongji University)
Employee voice and ostracism in teams: When is team innovation hurt?
Discussant: Jiang Yuan (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

12:30-2:00 p.m.

Lunch

2:00-3:45 p.m.

Leading for Creative Performance
Chair: Emily David (CEIBS)
Yaping Gong (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)

Narcissistic and humble leadership in team potency and creativity: A tale of two styles
Chi-Ying Cheng (Singapore Management University)
Women in business: Gender-professional identity integration (G-PII) and creativity
Aichia Chuang (National Taiwan University)
Enhancing the creativity of employees’ ideas: A quasi-experimental investigation of rewards, choice, and personality
Discussant: Tae-Yeol Kim (CEIBS)

3:45-4:00 p.m.

Break

4:00-5:00 p.m.

Workshops: 

 

 

Moderator

Experts

1

Leading for proactivity Michelle Zheng Sharon Parker
Wu Liu

2

Leading for employee voice Larry Farh Troy Smith 
Jian Liang

3

Leading for creative performance Flora Chiang Yaping Gong
Chi-Ying Cheng
Aichia Chuang

Location: AC3-115, CEIBS Shanghai Campus, 699 Hongfeng Road, Pudong, Shanghai P.R. of China.
中欧国际工商学院教三115,中国上海浦东新区红枫路699号。

Hotel: We have reserved a limited number of rooms on the CEIBS campus at a reduced rate for symposium attendees. Please contact Grace Chen for more information and reservations.

Contacts: If you have any questions please contact Grace Chen (Email: cgrace2@ceibs.edu, Tel: +86 21 28905056) or An-Chih (Andrew) Wang (Email: wac@ceibs.edu)

WORKSHOPS
The purpose of the workshops during the symposium is to facilitate networking between participants with common interests, to identify potential avenues for future research, and to facilitate collaborative research. The aim is to have an open discussion in order to identify frontiers for future research within the scope of the theme of the group. Each group will have a facilitator and experts from the earlier sessions. All participants will get the opportunity to introduce their interests and structure the subsequent discussion. Experts will provide comments on the emergent ideas and will help identify common themes and challenges in the area.

Presentation 1

Title

Leading for proactivity and wise proactivity: Some findings and new directions

Presenter

Sharon K. Parker

Abstract

This presentation will present an overview model linking leadership and both the level/frequency of proactive behaviour and the extent to which that proactivity is “wise.” Wise proactivity refers to proactive behaviour that considers the task and strategic context, the social and relational context, and one's own self-regulation. I argue that, although some aspects of leadership are expected to affect both aspects, there are also distinct leadership implications. The presentation will include some existing published studies by myself and colleagues, some new studies, and some suggested new directions for the field. I will also outline practical implications.

Presentation 2

Title

Some anger works, some anger hurts: Leader’s display of anger and employee proactive behaviour

Presenter

Wu Liu

Abstract

Leader’s anger may have complicated effects on employee proactive behaviours or behaviours that are self-initiated, future-oriented, and change-inducing. In this project, we differentiate two types of anger— integral anger (anger directly targeted at something in the tasks) and incidental anger (anger unrelated to and/or lacking a clear target). We discuss how these two types of anger may influence employee proactive behaviours differently. We collected experience sampling method (ESM) data of 799 matched daily surveys from 82 leader-member dyads to test our hypotheses.

Presentation 3

Title

A follower-centric perspective on empowering leadership: The role of employee voice

Presenter

Troy A. Smith

Abstract

Integrating role-based followership theory and the elaboration likelihood model of social persuasion, we analyse how two forms of follower voice impact the extent to which leaders empower the voicing follower. Rather than taking a traditional leader-centric approach to analysing how empowering leadership impacts followers’ motivation and performance, we use a follower-centric perspective to examine whether follower challenging and supportive voice indirectly impact a leader’s decision to empower his/her voicing follower through the leader’s perception of the follower’s organisational commitment. We also explore whether follower citizenship behaviours magnify or buffer the effects that challenging voice and supportive voice have on the leader’s perception of the follower’s organisational commitment. A multi-source and multi-time point research study conducted in the People’s Republic of China mostly supported our theoretical model. Specifically, we found that supportive voice had a positive indirect relationship with empowering leadership through the leader’s perception of the follower’s organisational commitment, especially when the follower engaged in higher levels of supervisor-focused citizenship behaviours. Inversely, we found that challenging voice had a conditional negative indirect relationship with empowering leadership through the leader’s perception of the follower’s organisational commitment, when the follower engaged in lower levels of supervisor-focused citizenship behaviours.

Presentation 4

Title

Employee voice and ostracism in teams: When is team innovation hurt?

Presenter

Jian Liang

Abstract

Making constructive suggestions is the essential first step in any innovation process. However, there is evidence that team members occasionally withhold their improvement-oriented suggestions, fearing that speaking up may hurt their relationships with their co-workers. Yet surprisingly, no empirical studies have ever been conducted to validate this connection between voice and its negative interpersonal outcome, nor to unravel the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions. Drawing upon self-protection perspective, we propose that a voice champion is likely to be ostracised by another co-worker because voice behaviour poses an image-threat to the co-worker. This relationship is enhanced when the co-worker interprets voice behaviour as driven by the voicer’s self-enhancement motive, or they are embedded in a high competitive climate. Furthermore, team innovation suffers where group members who speak up have a greater propensity to be ostracised by their peers. Using a scenario-based experimental study and a time-lagged survey study, we found support for our hypotheses. Implications, limitations as well as future directions are discussed.

Presentation 5

Title

Narcissistic and humble leadership in team potency and creativity: A tale of two styles

Presenter

Yaping Gong

Abstract

Research has shown that narcissists are often creative individuals and rise to leadership positions. Departing from the positive relationship between narcissism and creativity at the individual level, we contend that narcissism as a leadership style harms team creativity because it reduces team potency. Grounded in paradox theory, we further bring in humble leadership as a contradictory style and boundary condition, theorising its co-existence and cross-section with narcissistic leadership. Our conceptual model predicts that humble leadership counter-balances the detrimental effects of narcissistic leadership on team potency and consequently team creativity via team potency. Using multi-source, two-wave data from 83 teams comprising 589 members and their team leaders, we found general support for the model. Our findings underscore the importance of incorporating both bright and dark leadership to understand team creativity, and offer implications for the multilevel generalisation of theory in creativity research.

Presentation 6

Title

Women in business: Gender-professional identity integration (G-PII) and creativity

Presenter

Chi-Ying Cheng

Abstract

While female leaders are becoming a growing trend in many professional domains including business, women encounter unique challenges associated with their gender identity at work. For example, Carly Fiorina, former CEO of Hewlett-Packard, attributed her fall to being a female leader working in a male-dominated industry. Gender is usually an easily observed and salient aspect of a person’s identity. This suggests that female leaders working in a male-dominated industry may experience conflict between their gender and professional identities because their dual identities give rise to different gender-related expectations. I argue that how female business leaders negotiate between their gender and business identities influences their creative performance. Creative cognition theory proposes that creativity requires novel combinations of existing requisite knowledge sets. These knowledge sets, in turn, are bundled with social identities. I hypothesise that identity integration—or individual differences in perceived compatibility between social identities—predicts creative idea generation and creative idea selection. Study 1 found that female businesspersons with high levels of gender-professional identity integration (G-PII)—or those who perceived their gender and professional identities as compatible—generated more creative ideas for identity-relevant tasks than those with low G-PII. However, the same effect was not evident for non-identity relevant tasks. Study 2 further supported the proposed proposition using a creative idea selection task. These findings show that the degree to which female business leaders integrate their female and business identities may be related to the extent to which multiple knowledge systems can be accessed simultaneously, which in turn facilitates both creative idea generation and selection. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Presentation 7

Title

Enhancing the creativity of employees’ ideas: A quasi-experimental investigation of rewards, choice, and personality

Presenter

Aichia Chaung

Abstract

We conducted a quasi-experimental field study of an organisation-wide suggestion programme to examine the effects of two general classes of rewards—those that benefited the idea generator (Self) and those that benefited charities (Other)—on the creativity of ideas employees submitted to the programme. We also examined whether having a choice of these rewards contributed to creativity and whether creative personality interacted with reward category (Self vs. Other) to affect creativity. Finally, we probed the effectiveness of intrinsic motivation (IM) and creative self-efficacy (CSE) as mediators of these effects. Results showed no main effects for reward category, yet having a choice produced more creative ideas, and creative personality interacted with reward category such that in the Other condition, employees with more creative personalities produced ideas of greater creativity than the employees with less creative personalities. CSE mediated the effects of both choice and the reward x personality interaction whereas IM mediated the effects of choice alone. The philosophical school of thought of Confucius inspired our identifying the Other reward type and investigating the interaction involving rewards and creative personality, paving a new way of seeing how rewards can boost creativity, particularly for employees having high levels of creative personality.

Sharon K. Parker

Dr. Sharon K. Parker is an ARC Laureate Fellow, a Professor of Organisational Behaviour at the Curtin Faculty of Business and Law, an Honorary fellow at the University of Western Australia, and an Honorary Professor at the University of Sheffield where she was previously Director at the Institute of Work Psychology. She is a recipient of the ARC’s Kathleen Fitzpatrick Award and the Academy of Management OB Division Mentoring Award. Her research focuses particularly on job and work design, and she is also interested in employee performance and development, especially their proactive behaviour. She is the Director of the Centre for Transformative Work Design. She has published more than 100 internationally refereed articles, including publications in top tier journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, and the Annual Review of Psychology on these topics. Sharon is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organisational Psychology. She is an Associate Editor for the Academy of Management Annals, a past Associate Editor of the leading organisational psychology journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, and she has served on numerous editorial boards. Professor Parker has attracted competitive research funding worth over $40,000,000, and has worked as a researcher and consultant in a wide range of public and private organisations. Her research has been cited more than 17,000 times.


Wu Liu

Dr. Wu Liu is Associate Professor with tenure at the Department of Management and Marketing, Faculty of Business at Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He obtained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the School of Management at Fudan University, China, and then his Ph.D. in organisation studies at Vanderbilt University, U.S.A. His research passion is on employee voice behaviour, leadership and team, and cross-cultural conflict management. His work has been published in various international top-tier journals, such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Organisational Behaviour and Human Decision Processes.


Troy A. Smith

Dr. Troy A. Smith is currently an Assistant Professor of Management at the College of Business at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Troy earned his Ph.D. Degree in Management from Texas A&M University. His research focuses on the intersection of leadership and motivation across levels of analysis, the impact of follower characteristics and behaviours on the leadership process, and the spill-over effects of work and non-work factors. Beyond his research, Troy enjoys reading, playing and watching sports, and spending quality time with his beautiful wife and four daughters.


Jian Liang

Dr. Jian Liang is a management professor at the Advance Institute of Business, Tongji University. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Management at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He has received a number of awards for his research including Emerald Citations of Excellence Awards (2015), the Academy of Management OB Division Best Paper with International Implications Award (2013) and the International Association of Chinese Management Research (IACMR) Best Conference Paper Award (2008). His research focuses on employee proactivity, leadership effectiveness, social exchange in organisations and business ethics. His articles have appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Organisational Behaviour, Management and Organisation Review, and other Chinese management journals.


Yaping Gong

Dr. Yaping Gong is Chair Professor of Management at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His research interests include goal orientation, employee creativity, teams, and strategic and international human resource management. He has published in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management, Journal of Organisational Behaviour, Human Resource Management, and Human Relations. His work has won the 2013 and 2016 Emerald Citation of Excellence Awards, Journal of Management Scholarly Impact Finalist Award, and Papers of Excellence in International HRM Award. He is currently an Associate Editor for the Academy of Management Perspectives. He has served or is currently serving as an editorial board member or senior editor for journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Organisational Behaviour, Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology, Management and Organisation Review, and the Asia Pacific Journal of Management.


Chi-Ying Cheng

Dr. Chi-Ying Cheng is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the Singapore Management University. She received her Ph.D. in organisational psychology from the University of Michigan. Before SMU, Chi-Ying taught at Columbia Business School. Her research examines the underlying psychological mechanisms and behavioural outcomes of dual identity integration with special foci on culture and gender. She also investigates the influence of multicultural exposure on individual and organisational outcomes such as creativity. Chi-Ying’s work has been published in top psychological and managerial journals including Psychological Science, PNAS, Leadership Quarterly, and Management and Organisational Review.


Aichia Chuang

Dr. Aichia Chuang is the Fu-Bon Endowed Chair in Management at the National Taiwan University in Taiwan, where she is professor of Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management in the Department of Business Administration. She earned her doctorate in Human Resources and Industrial Relations from the University of Minnesota. Chuang’s research interests include leadership, inclusion (person-environment fit and diversity), entrepreneurship, cross-cultural management, service climate and service performance, creativity, and multilevel theories and methods. Her research has appeared in such journals as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Organisational Behaviour and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Organisational Behaviour, and Harvard Business Review. She is currently an Associate Editor for Human Relations, the Representative-at-Large: Asia Pacific for the International Association for Chinese Management Research (IACMR), and the HR Ambassador of the HR Division of the Academy of Management representing Taiwan. She is on the editorial board of the Academy of Management Journal, Organisational Behaviour and Human Decision Processes, Human Resource Management Review, Management and Organisation Review, and the Asia Pacific Journal of Management.


If you have any questions please contact Grace Chen (Email: cgrace2@ceibs.edu, Tel: +86 21 28905056) or An-Chih (Andrew) Wang (Email: wac@ceibs.edu)