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Tuesday, November 26, 2019

4th Annual CEIBS OB/HR Symposium: Responsible Leadership in Action

4th Annual CEIBS OB/HR Symposium
Responsible Leadership in Action

The CEIBS OB/HR Symposium is a forum for academics to discuss their latest research in organisational behaviour and human resource management topics. This year we will examine the impact of responsible leadership on employees, work teams, and organisations in Chinese contexts.

Presenters are individuals who are on the cutting-edge of research in our field and whose work represents creative and high-quality scholarship. We strive to keep the conference numbers small and to provide an intimate setting to foster collaborative ties and a supportive atmosphere.  

There is no registration fee for this symposium. However, attendance is limited to 150 people due to space restrictions. Preference will be given to faculty for this symposium and then on a first come, first served basis via the following link: 

Online Registration

Date: November 26, 2019

Time: The symposium will begin with registration at 8:00AM and finish at 5:00PM.

Agenda:

8:00 a.m.

Registration and Breakfast

8:30-8:45 a.m.

Welcome by Tae-Yeol Kim, Chair of OB/HR Dept.
Opening address by Prof. Weijiong Zhang, Co-Dean, CEIBS 

8:45-9:45 a.m.

Keynote Speech by Anne Tsui (University of Notre Dame)
Chair: Katherine Xin (CEIBS)

Responsible Research: Enhancing Rigor and Relevance in Responsible Leadership Studies

9:45-10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15-12:00 p.m.

Panel I Leading by morality
Chair: Andrew Wang (CEIBS) 
Ryan Fehr (University of Washington)

What does it mean for a leader to be moral? Considerations on the ethical dimension of leadership
Sam Yam (National University of Singapore)
The downsides of morality at work
Hao Zhao (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Servant leadership: Background, cultural context, and new frontiers

12:00-1:30 p.m.

Lunch and Group photo

1:30-2:30 p.m.

Keynote Speech by Chao Chen (Rutgers University)
Chair: Larry Farh (CEIBS)

Confucian Self-Reflection, Leader Moral Character, and Responsible Leadership

2:30-3:00 p.m.

Break

3:00-4:45 p.m.

Panel II Antecedents and outcomes of firm-level responsible leadership
Chair: Byron Lee (CEIBS)
Jianjun Zhang (Peking University) 

Mimicry dynamics: A study of multinational enterprises’ philanthropic donation to disaster relief in China 
Melody Manchi Chao (HKUST)
Cause-related marketing and employee engagement: The roles of admiration, implicit morality beliefs, and moral identity
Ho Kwong Kwan (CEIBS)
Antecedents and outcomes of CEO family-supportive supervisor behaviours

4:45-5:00 p.m.

Closing and concluding remarks by Anne Tsui, Chao Chen, and Tae-Yeol Kim moderated by Jean Lee

Location: AC3-115, CEIBS Shanghai Campus - 699, Hongfeng Road, Shanghai, 201206

Hotel: We have reserved a limited number of rooms on the CEIBS campus at a reduced rate for symposium attendees. Please contact Grace Chen for more information and reservations.

Contacts: If you have any questions please contact Grace Chen (Email: cgrace2@ceibs.edu, Tel: +86 21 28905056) or Prof. Larry Farh (Email: jlfarh@ceibs.edu).

Keynote Speech I

Title

Responsible Research: Enhancing Rigor and Relevance in Responsible Leadership Studies

Presenter

Anne Tsui

Abstract

Over the past three decades, criticisms abound that business school research suffers from a lack of both rigor and relevance. The former is referred to as the “credibility crisis” and is due to the prevalence of many questionable research practices (such as HARKing, P-hacking, data manipulation, sample trimming), causing the results of most published work to be untrustworthy and the majority of the studies not being replicable. The latter is known as the “relevance crisis” and it refers to the large gap between research and practice. However, neither rigor nor relevance alone is sufficient for research to be useful in solving business problems and for addressing society’s needs. The Responsible Research in Business and Management (RRBM) initiative points out the interdependent nature of rigor and relevance and formulates seven principles to facilitate the production of knowledge that is both credible and useful. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the topic of responsible leadership. Given its global interest and contemporary importance, responsible leadership is a promising area to apply the principles of responsible research. Using illustrative questions, I will show how these seven principles offer guidance in designing studies of responsible leadership to produce credible and reliable results and potentially useful knowledge. It is also an opportunity for the scientific community in business schools to demonstrate responsible leadership by transforming our research from a focus on only the interests of the researchers and their schools to a focus on the ultimate users of knowledge, including students, managers, and policy makers. Responsible researchers can help businesses and, through their responsible leadership, be a positive force for a better world.

Keynote Speech II

Title

Confucian Self-reflection, Leader Moral Character, and Responsible Leadership

Presenter

Chao C. Chen

Abstract

Irresponsible corporate behaviours have often been viewed as traces of character flaws of those who occupy leadership positions. Character strength and virtue ethics have been proposed as sources of responsible behaviours. The question is, for the promotion of responsible leadership, what mechanisms could be put in place for the development and enhancement of character? Existing theory and research in business ethics treat character as largely stable for adults and point to enculturation as the primary means of facilitating ethical leadership. Confucianism, however, viewed character cultivation as a purposeful, life-long process by individual actors engaged in frequent and conscientious self-reflection. Drawing on Confucianism and social psychological theory on moral self-regulation, I present a theoretical model of self-reflection, leader moral character cultivation and responsible leadership in the workplace. Linking the Confucian view of junzi (noble person) and responsible leadership, I will discuss what responsible leadership entails, and how leader character can be strengthened through interlocking (moral) self-reflection steps of introspection, self-accountable cognitions and emotions, and self-rectification. I then identify factors that are likely to activate self-reflection processes, which in turn can facilitate character cultivation and responsible leadership. Potential boundary conditions will also be proposed. Finally, I will present findings of preliminary research regarding self-reflection and its effects on leadership and supervision.

Panel 1
Leading by Morality: Moral Foundations of Leadership, Cultural Boundaries, and Potential Downsides

In this panel, we examine the moral dimension of leadership both theoretically and empirically. The first presentation proposes new ways of thinking about what it means to be an ethical leader. The second focuses particularly on servant leadership and the role of cultural settings. The third challenges the well-accepted optimistic view regarding the consequences of being moral in the workplace.

Panel 1 – Presentation 1

Title

What Does is Mean for a Leader to be Moral? Considerations on the Ethical Dimension of Leadership

Presenter

Ryan Fehr

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in research on ethical leadership and related constructs. Although this literature has deeply improved our understanding of the ethical dimension of leader behaviour, it has also suffered from limitations. In particular, the ethical leadership literature often overlooks the question of what, exactly, comprises the moral domain. In this talk, I will draw from the moralization and moral foundations literatures to propose new ways of thinking about what it means to be an ethical leader.

Panel 1 – Presentation 2

Title

The Downsides of Morality at Work

Presenter

Sam KC Yam

Abstract

To date, scholars have remained largely optimistic about the consequences of being paragons of morality. In this talk I will challenge aspects of this commonly-held belief. In the first project, I will present studies that explore the tension between morality, humour, and likeability. Across six studies, I find that moral employees are less likely to appreciate humour and generate jokes others found funny, which in turn lead to lower ratings of likeability. In the second project, I will focus on ethical leaders. Contrary to the vast literature on ethical leadership, I find that followers engage in the least citizenship behaviour towards both highly ethical and highly unethical leaders. In the final project, I will focus on the selection process. In three studies with both professional and novice interviewers, I find that the morality of the candidate interacts with the nature of the job such that candidates who send signals of morality are less likely to be selected for morally-tainted jobs, compared to neutral candidates. Although our society will be better off if people are moral, my work shows that there can be significant social and professional costs in displaying morality at work.  

Panel 1 – Presentation 3

Title

Servant Leadership: Background, Cultural Context, and New Frontiers

Presenter

Hao Zhao

Abstract

Servant leaders prioritise the needs and interests of others in the organisation and the larger community. I will introduce servant leadership’s origins, current knowledge, and its relevance in China. We recently tested a dual mediation model using multiple samples in China and found the effect of servant leadership on employees’ work engagement is primarily through the social exchange process instead of the social learning process. I will also discuss opportunities for future research, including new theoretical perspectives, methodological improvements, further attention to the cultural context, and potentially unintended consequences.

Panel II: The Impact and Antecedents of Actions of the Firm Related to Responsible Leadership

In this panel, we examine specific actions that firms and CEOs take and explore why firms choose to take actions related to responsible leadership and the impact of such actions on internal stakeholders. The panel first examines why multinationals in China participate in corporate philanthropy. We then investigate the impact of cause-related marketing on employees. Finally, we consider how CEO family supportive behaviours impact top management teams.

Panel II – Presentation 1

Title

Mimicry Dynamics: A Study of Multinational Enterprises’ Philanthropic Donations to Disaster Relief in China

Presenter

Jianjun Zhang

Abstract

Institutional theory suggests mimicry under uncertainty, but cannot explain whom multinational enterprises (MNEs) imitate, home country peers or host country competitors? Based on MNEs’ donations to disaster relief following the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake in China, we develop a staged model of MNEs’ mimetic behaviour, arguing that MNEs imitate home country peers first and host industry competitors second, as an adaptation to a social movement comparing them with their domestic competitors. Further, we propose that liability of foreignness strengthens the imitation of home country peers in the early stage, but mitigates the adaptation later, whereas reputation enhances imitation in both stages. Empirical analysis of a longitudinal sample of MNEs’ donation supports our hypotheses. Our study contributes to institutional theory and corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature.

Panel II – Presentation 2

Title

Cause-related Marketing and Employee Engagement: The Roles of Admiration, Implicit Morality Beliefs, and Moral Identity

Presenter

Melody Chao

Abstract

Cause-related marketing refers to supporting a charitable cause or a non-profit organisation to promote sales. Studies examining the effectiveness of cause-related marketing have focused almost exclusively on consumer-related outcomes. Little is known about its effects on employees. Understanding how cause-related marketing influences employees is important because employees have the most proximal and intensive exposure to the practices. Two field experiments found that cause-related marketing enhances employees’ admiration for their company, which in turn promotes job engagement. Importantly, employee’s implicit morality beliefs and moral identity centrality jointly moderate these relationships. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings will be discussed.

Panel II – Presentation 3

Title

Antecedents and Outcomes of CEO Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviours

Presenter

Ho Kwong Kwan

Abstract

Family-supportive supervisor behaviours (FSSB) are behaviours performed by supervisors that are supportive of subordinates’ families. These behaviours help followers reduce work-family conflict and achieve work-life balance. While most research has focused on frontline employees and supervisors, research on CEOs’ FSSB is overlooked. In this study, we attempt to explore how and why CEOs exhibit FSSB and its beneficial effects on top management teams.

Anne Tsui

Anne S. Tsui is a Distinguished Adjunct Professor at the University of Notre Dame, Motorola Professor Emerita of International Management at the Arizona State University, and Distinguished Visiting Professor at Peking University and Fudan University, China. She previously served on the faculty of Duke University, University of California, Irvine, and was the Founding Head of the Management Department at the Business School of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She is the 67th President and Fellow of the Academy of Management, 14th Editor the Academy of Management Journal, Founding President of the International Association for Chinese Management Research and Founding Editor-in-Chief of Management and Organization Review. She is also a Fellow of the Academy of International Business. Her research interests include executive leadership, employment relationship, demographic diversity, income inequality, and international management especially in the Chinese context. She has a strong commitment to doctoral education and a strong advocate of responsible social science in business. She co-founded the Community for Responsible Research in Business and Management (www.rrbm.network), an inter-disciplinary, global, grassroots movement to advance both the credibility and the usefulness of research for both business and society. She has received numerous awards, including best paper awards from AMJ, ASQ, and JOM, the Center for Creative Leadership Applied Leadership Research Award, the University of Minnesota Outstanding Achievement Award, the AoM Distinguished Service Contribution Award, and the IACMR Lifetime Contribution Award. Dr. Tsui received her BA in Psychology from the University of Minnesota, Duluth; MA in Industrial Relations from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis-St. Paul; and PhD in Management from the University of California, Los Angeles. In May 2015, she received an Honorary Doctorate in Economics from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.


Chao Chen

Chao C. Chen is a Professor of Organisation Management and Global Business at Rutgers Business School, Rutgers University. He completed his undergraduate studies at Central South University in China, was a British Council Scholar of postgraduate studies at Manchester University and Warwick University in the UK, and received his PhD in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resources Management from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has published over 60 journal articles and book chapters in diverse areas of cross-cultural management, leadership, organisational justice, Chinese management, and business ethics. He co-edited a book on Chinese leadership and management philosophies and theories. His research appears in premier management journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organization Science, Journal of International Business, and Journal of Business Venturing. He teaches at the undergraduate, MBA, Executive MBA, and doctoral levels on management skills, organisational behaviour, culture and organisation. He has visited and taught at Chinese universities, including CEIBS, Nanjing University, Peking University and Shanghai Jiaotong University. He has also served as the President of the International Association for Chinese Management Research.


Ryan Fehr

Ryan Fehr is an Associate Professor of Management and Michael G. Foster Endowed Fellow at the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business. His research interests include positive organisational scholarship, ethics and morality, and leadership. He received his PhD in Organisational Psychology from the University of Maryland. Ryan's work has been published in outlets such as the Academy of Management Review, Psychological Bulletin, Journal of Applied Psychology, and OBHDP. He has received multiple best paper awards from the Academy of Management, and has been featured in a wide range of news outlets such as NPR, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. At the Foster School of Business he teaches ethics in the undergraduate and MBA programmes.


Sam Yam

Sam Yam is an Assistant Professor of Management at the National University of Singapore Business School. He received his PhD in Organisational Behaviour, with a focus on Business Ethics, from the University of Washington. He also holds an MA in Child Development and an MS in Organisational Behaviour. Sam’s research focuses primarily on behavioural ethics, leadership, and humour. His work has been published in outlets such as Academy of Management Annals, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Organizational Behavioural and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology.


Hao Zhao

Hao Zhao is an Associate Professor at Lally School of Management, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute located in Troy, New York. He obtained his PhD from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and his Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees from Renmin University of China. His research interests include leadership, entrepreneurship, staffing, and employee creativity. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Management, and Leadership Quarterly. He has won the Emerald Citations of Excellence Award three times.


Jianjun Zhang

Jianjun Zhang is a Professor of Organisational and Strategic Management at Guanghua school of Management, Peking University. He received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. His recent research focuses on topics such as Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR), Corporate Political Activities (CAP) and Institutional Logics.

Professor Zhang has published dozens of scholarly articles, which have appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, California Management Review, Management Organization Review, Asia Pacific Journal of Management, and so forth. He is also the author of Marketization and Democracy in China.


Melody Manchi Chao

Melody Manchi Chao is an Associate Professor at the Department of Management and Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies at the School of Business and Management at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She received her PhD and MA in Social Psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and BA in Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. She is an accredited mediator and a certified swimming coach. Prior to pursuing her graduate degrees, she worked in a community-based mental health and substance abuse treatment agency in San Francisco. Her research interests include diversity, dispute resolution, and well-being and burnout. She currently serves on the editorial review boards of Personnel Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Management and Organization Review, Frontiers in Psychology, and Asian Journal of Social Psychology. She is a past winner of the Early Career Award from the International Academy of Intercultural Research, the Michael Harris Bond Award for Early Research Contributions from the Asian Association of Social Psychology, and the Seisoh Sukemune/Bruce Bain Encouragement of Early Career Research Award from the International Council of Psychologists.


Ho Kwong Kwan

Dr. Ho Kwong Kwan is an Associate Professor of Management in the Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management Department at China Europe International Business School (CEIBS). He received his PhD from Drexel University. He has published over 60 articles in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Management Studies, Organizational Behaviour and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology. He is currently a senior editor for the Asia Pacific Journal of Management, an editorial review board member for the Journal of Vocational Behaviour, and a board representative for the Asia Academy of Management.


If you have any questions please contact Grace Chen (Email: cgrace2@ceibs.edu, Tel: +86 21 28905056) or Prof. Larry Farh (Email: jlfarh@ceibs.edu).