The 4th Shanghai MBA Case Teaching Competition Winner Announcement

Submitted by Ning GAN on Sat, 04/30/2022 - 08:00
Department
Writer
Liya Zou
Editor
Amy LIANG
Article Description

As part of efforts to promote best practices and innovations in MBA case teaching, the Shanghai MBA Education Steering Committee (as host) and Shanghai MBA Education Steering Committee’s Panel on Case Development and CEIBS (as organizer) have revealed the winners of the 4th Shanghai MBA Case Teaching Competition, with support from Shanghai Academic Degrees Office and Shanghai MBA Education Steering Committee. Some 80% of entrants used their own self-developed cases for the contest. The committee handed out two First Prizes and four Second Prizes following a rigorous screening process that included institution recommendations, expert reviews and final approval from the Shanghai MBA Education Steering Committee.

Exclude from all News Lists
Off
Exclude from the Main News List
Off
Is Faculty Awards
On
CEIBS Knowledge
Off

2022 Global Contest for the Best China-Focused Cases: Call for Submissions

Submitted by Ning GAN on Fri, 04/22/2022 - 10:45
Department
Writer
Liya Zou
Editor
Amy LIANG
Article Description

To further promote teaching and research of management issues relevant to a Chinese business context, the Steering Committee of the Shanghai MBA Case Development and Sharing Platform is pleased to announce the launch of the 2022 Global Contest for the Best China-Focused Cases. The contest is open to case developers both inside and outside China.

The contest particularly welcomes those cases that examine China-focused issues from a global perspective together with high-quality, in-depth teaching notes that incorporate theoretical analyses and/or best practices in their focal areas. During the past seven years, the contest has welcomed 1,679 cases by more than 2,000 authors from over 300 schools and institutions in China and around the world. A wealth of high-quality cases emerged from the contest and 770 submissions met the acceptance criteria of ChinaCases.Org, 77 of which proceeded to win awards. By focusing on the latest management issues, these cases have ignited intense discussions and enriched classroom teaching, and ultimately inspiring and changing management practices (learn more about our past winners at http://www.chinacases.org).

Categories
Exclude from all News Lists
Off
Exclude from the Main News List
Off
Is Faculty Awards
Off
CEIBS Knowledge
Off

Glue or gasoline? Do inter-company links fan the flames of hyper-competition?

Submitted by Gavin Yang on Thu, 08/12/2021 - 13:35

By Tieying Yu, Wei Guo, Javier Gimeno and Yu Zhang

Competitive wars can be hugely destructive for the firms who engage in them (and their third-party partners). Most prior studies on the subject have focused on price wars – and what economic factors triggers them. However, little is understood about how social factors such as inter-organisational linkages influence these wars.

A recent study we have conducted sheds new light on this area by exploring how the social embeddedness of firms may either escalate or de-escalate competitive wars. Our study demonstrates that such connections between firms can actually do both.

Competitive wars are defined as a distinct form of hyper-aggressive competition between commercial rivals. Such a war is fought by participants across one or several markets in the hope that they can force their rivals to redraw the shape of the markets they are battling over, allowing them more favourable market share, or a prime position in an entirely new status hierarchy. This differs from the day-to-day commercial activities (minor adjustments of price levels, launching new marketing strategies, developing new products/services, etc.) that characterise ‘normal’ levels of competition. Due to the complex, interconnected nature of global commerce, competitive wars can easily spill over into other interconnected markets. This makes it increasingly important to understand the factors that trigger and spread competitive wars, given their vast destructive potential at the firm and industry levels.

Our results show that both direct linkages (i.e., strategic alliances) and indirect linkages (i.e., common ownership ties and common analyst ties) reduce the likelihood of competitive wars breaking out and function like glue that binds firms together. We also found that after wars begin, indirect linkages through common third parties may continue to have a similar ‘glue-like’ effect, reducing the likelihood of the war spilling over into the focal market. That said, we also found that, if a war does break out, direct linkages between firms may in fact facilitate the spillover of competitive wars, like pouring gasoline on a fire.

These findings have been drawn from our analysis of 4,086 competitive wars between US domestic airline companies in 2,066 geographic markets over a period of 20 years (1991-2010). Ours is a novel approach, since we drew on multimarket competition research to identify the spillover effects of competitive wars across markets, whereas traditional studies examine competitive wars largely as independent events limited to a single market. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that systematically examines the occurrence and spillover of competitive wars.

Our findings have several practical implications for firms considering the implications of their inter-organisational links, and how likely they are to be drawn into a competitive war. Firstly, prior research has tended to assume that cooperative relationships in the past will breed more cooperation in the future. However, our study found that once war breaks out, trust may turn into mistrust amongst partners, and consequently glue can be turned into gasoline, amplifying the chances of the war spilling over. Firms should be aware of this possibility, and carefully assess the strength of their strategic alliances before going to war with their rivals, or when preparing to defend against one.

Secondly, our study’s results support the widely held, but lightly explored, theory of mutual forbearance. This theory suggests that multimarket rivals are less likely to engage in competitive wars because they fear the prospect of cross-market retaliation. Our results support this: multimarket rivals warring in one market are likely to spread the war to other markets where they are present. Accordingly, any firm willing to go to war with a multimarket rival in one space should prepare themselves for battle across all markets where both sides are present.

Finally, our study highlights the crucial influence that third parties with ties of common ownership have as mediators in competitive wars. Our findings suggest that when competition escalates into catastrophic warfare, common ownership ties can help to prevent the situation from worsening, which is beneficial for all three sides, and the industry as a whole.

This article refers to a paper entitled, “Glue or Gasoline? The Role of Inter-Organizational Linkages in the Occurrence and Spillover of Competitive Wars” by Tieying Yu, Wei Guo, Javier Gimeno and Yu Zhang in the Academy of Management Journal here.

Tieying Yu is a Professor at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College. Wei Guo is an Assistant Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at CEIBS. For more on her teaching and research interests, please visit her faculty profile here. Javier Gimeno is a Professor of Strategy at INSEAD. Yu Zhang is an Associate Professor of Strategy at CEIBS. For more on his teaching and research interests, please visit his faculty profile here.

Author
Tieying Yu, Wei Guo, Javier Gimeno and Yu Zhang
Description

Competitive wars can be hugely destructive for the firms who engage in them (and their third-party partners). Most prior studies on the subject have focused on price wars – and what economic factors triggers them. However, little is understood about how social factors such as inter-organisational linkages influence these wars.

Faculty Name
组织机构

Is mixing business and booze leaving you with a hangover?

Submitted by Gavin Yang on Fri, 07/23/2021 - 09:42

By Michael Ho Kwong Kwan, Haixiao Chen, Zhonghui Hu and Jinsong Li

In China, drinking is a well-recognised part of doing business and facilitating social exchange. Moreover, as the Chinese business world becomes more competitive, drinking is considered to be a beneficial behaviour for business success. But is booze really a good short-cut to forming (and maintaining) relations, or is it finally time to re-think that next round?

Westerners coming to China for business purposes have long had difficulty grasping the local drinking culture. Talking business whilst getting drunk may seem incongruous and counter-intuitive; nevertheless, drinking culture is widespread in China yet diverse between regions. Generally speaking, drinking has been linked with business more closely in the north, compared to the south. In the north, for example, there is an old saying that a banquet without alcohol is no banquet at all. Drinking is considered to be a good way to show respect and hospitality for guests, and is often used as an extension of the boardroom.

But in some southern regions, like Shanghai and Guangzhou, people prefer tea rather than alcohol during business occasions. Such differences are commonly said to be for a number of reasons. One is the geographical environment and climatic factors. It is colder in North China, and thus, northerners are said to enjoy warming themselves by drinking. According to traditional Chinese thinking, this habit makes northerners very fond of, and good at, drinking.

Another reason is the social environment and cultural factors. Northerners are commonly said to be characterised by openness and directness, while southerners are more graceful and restrained. Compared with their southern cousins, people are keen on toasting in the north to show their hospitality. When northerners propose a toast, the more alcohol the guests drink, the happier the host will be. To be refused by the guests would mean a loss of face for the host. Due to all these reasons, guests may drink more and are more likely to get drunk when attending a banquet in the north.

Business in China has a long-standing association with alcohol. The country’s Confucian culture emphasises introversion where people rarely release their emotions, especially during business occasions. As such, some businessmen use alcohol to shorten psychological distance and build and maintain friendships. Empirical evidence has indicated that drinking can promote relationships with business partners.

“The first glass of wine is all about the food, the second glass is about love, and the third glass is about mayhem,” says Marcos Alberti, a Brazilian photographer behind a project called “Three Glasses After.” As part of this project, Alberti snapped photos of his friends when they were sober, and then again after they had had one, two, and three glasses of wine. No matter how serious people were at the beginning, Alberti’s photos revealed that his subjects’ behaviours became visibly more relaxed with the effects of alcohol.

Similarly, some Chinese businesspeople hold that a person’s drinking attitude and style can, to a certain extent, reveal their true personality and quality. People who drink without hesitation can usually create the impression that they are straightforward and trustworthy. Thus, drinking at banquets is often considered an effective way to know get to know other people and build trust, which can lay an important foundation for success in business deals. After all, a good beginning is half the battle.

Although alcohol is beneficial for business in some ways, alcohol consumption can be divisive. Indeed, not all people regard the opportunity to drink as an advantage, given that alcohol may be detrimental to both drinkers, organisations, and even a country. As to the individual, alcohol consumption may increase the risk of many diseases.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) identifies alcohol as one of the world’s major health risks, related to nearly 60 kinds of diseases and injuries, and responsible for 4.5 million deaths annually. Cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, and cirrhosis of the liver are all possible consequences of alcohol consumption.

For organisations, alcohol has been found to increase absenteeism, workplace aggression and harm employees’ job satisfaction and organisational commitment. According to a survey from China Youth Daily, about 84% of 109,441 interviewees felt that drinking at official banquets was a leading workplace stressor and lowered employee initiative and performance.

On a national level, unhealthy drinking culture may lead to considerable social and economic problems. Many countries throughout history have banned alcohol consumption at certain periods; for example, in Russia from 1914 to 1925, in Finland from 1919 to 1932, and in the United States from 1920 to 1933. The Chinese government has also prohibited civil servants from drinking alcoholic beverages at official banquets in recent years.

Moreover, practices such as recreational activities with public funds, drinking during workdays, and excessive alcohol consumption are all deemed rule-breaking behaviours linked to waste and the facilitation of corruption. The prohibition of alcohol not only aims to prohibit consumption but also the related unhealthy drinking culture and its perceived distorting effect on business decision-making.

When it comes to Chinese drinking culture and all the hazards of drinking behaviour, there are several coping strategies for foreigners doing business in China.

First, if you do not want to drink alcohol, make it clear before you start and stick it out. Usually, the host is aware of the cultural differences and will not force foreigners to drink.

Second, if you have reasonable excuses such as alcohol allergy, do not hesitate to let your business partner know.

Third, if you have to drink at a banquet, try to drink skilfully. For example, you can sip your drink slowly instead of taking large swigs. You can also try to drink tea or water as substitutes for alcohol. When necessary, you may bring a colleague or a friend who is good at drinking with you and let him/her stand in for you when it comes time to drink with the host.

This article is based on a paper entitled, “The effects of mentor alcohol use norms on mentorship quality: The moderating role of protégé traditionality” published in Human Resource Management here.

Michael Ho Kwong Kwan is an Associate Professor of Management at CEIBS. For more on his teaching and research interests, please visit his faculty profile here.

 

Author
Michael Ho Kwong Kwan, Haixiao Chen, Zhonghui Hu and Jinsong Li
Description

In China, drinking is a well-recognised part of doing business and facilitating social exchange. Moreover, as the Chinese business world becomes more competitive, drinking is considered to be a beneficial behaviour for business success. But is booze really a good short-cut to forming (and maintaining) relations, or is it finally time to re-think that next round?

Faculty Name
组织机构

Highlights from CEIBS Europe Forum 2019 in Brussels

Submitted by admin on Thu, 07/25/2019 - 09:52

July 12, 2019. Brussels – The CEIBS Insights 2019 Europe Forum series made its latest stop in Brussels today for a special roundtable workshop on the theme of The 4th Industrial Revolution: Opportunities and Challenges for Europe and China. The event, co-hosted by European economic think tank Bruegel, brought together nearly 100 representatives from CEIBS, the European Commission, the Mission of the People’s Republic of China to the European Union, and the EFMD, among others, for discussions exploring how China and Europe can balance policy and market forces to achieve sustainable technological innovation, how SMEs in both regions can leverage opportunities to expand into overseas markets, and how both sides can work together to improve bilateral cooperation.

Is Knowledge
关闭
Categories
Is WeChat Video
关闭
Video Forum
Original author
admin
组织机构
Translate redirect
node/10778

CEIBS CAIC Creates Sustainability Task Force

Submitted by admin on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 17:16
Department
Article Description

April 24, 2019. Shanghai — The concept of responsible business and sustainable development is receiving growing recognition, but it’s still a relatively new idea for many business executives. CEIBS has long had a commitment to educating responsible business leaders, and now the school’s international alumni chapter is officially making sustainability a part of its mandate. The CEIBS Alumni International Chapter (CAIC) has set up a Sustainability Task Force, with Global EMBA alumnus Niko Moesgaard at the helm as its Sustainability Officer. 

Categories
Exclude from all News Lists
Off
Exclude from the Main News List
Off
Is Faculty Awards
Off

Prof. Emily David Makes Poets & Quants’ List of 2019 Best 40 Under 40 Professors

Submitted by admin on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 14:26
Department
Photos
Article Description

April 25, 2018. Shanghai — CEIBS Assistant Professor of Management Emily David has been named one of the world’s best young business school professors by Poets & Quants, a leading resource for in-depth information on global business schools and the MBA journey. The list of Best 40 Under 40 Professors, released on April 22, is based on teaching and research skills.

Exclude from all News Lists
Off
Exclude from the Main News List
Off
Is Faculty Awards
On

Winning Over Internal Stakeholders To Make External Startup Engagement Work

Submitted by admin on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 10:26

By Associate Professor of International Business and Strategy Shameen Prashantham and Managing Director of Mavens & Mavericks Ltd. Sheelpa Patel

 

Recently, there has been a surge in interest among large corporations looking to engage with startups. Yet, owing to a lack of actual meaningful collaboration, startup initiatives are often met with skepticism and dismissed as mere PR exercises or “innovation theatre”. The problem behind this may well lie not so much on the outside, in terms of dealings with startups per se, but rather on the inside: an easily overlooked challenge is winning hearts and minds inside the organizations with which startups are hoping to engage.

An inability to have these organizations’ team members buy into, and embrace, the idea of engaging with startups is problematic for three reasons. First, it will make it difficult for internal audiences to perceive a coherent link between the startup and the corporation’s overall strategic priorities. Second, meaningful collaborative opportunities between the corporation and startup may not materialize as there is no great urge to push for implementation. Third, corporation’s employees are generally unaware of its startup initiatives; external perceptions could be harmed if (even casual) queries are met with ignorance.

Here we combine insights from extensive academic research with in-depth practical experience to suggest a three-pronged antidote to these challenges: (1) cultivating internal champions, (2) persuading opportunity generators, and (3) enthusing roving ambassadors. One of us – Sheelpa Patel – is the creator and former head of INFINITI LAB, the first automotive corporate accelerator in Asia established by INFINITI Motor Company, the premium brand owned by the Renault/Nissan/Mitsubishi Alliance. Established in 2015 primarily to achieve a brand objective, it evolved over time to become the driver for business and cultural transformation across the entire organization globally. Patel’s experiences illustrate these three strategies.

Cultivating internal champions. To redress the lack of clarity regarding how a startup initiative relates to the corporation’s overall strategy, it is important to gain support from senior executives who explicitly endorse the startup partnering initiative, thereby signaling its legitimacy. Such buy-in is important to connect the dots and provide the bigger picture of where the corporation is going. Patel vigorously promoted INFINITI LAB – a three-month global accelerator program at INFINITI’s HQ in Hong Kong – to the CEO and global executive team, convincing them to make it a priority and engage in the process. She sought their input on accelerator themes and problems to solve, participation in the startup selection process, mentoring throughout the program and presence at the final demo day to make decisions around which startups should proceed to POC (proof of concept). From a practical standpoint, this meant proactively securing slots on various executive team meeting agendas to pitch the Lab and present a story for the executives to “buy into”. This was followed up with 1:1 engagement meetings and regular presentations.

Persuading opportunity generators. To deal with the crucial difficulty of a lack of genuine collaborative opportunities, it is imperative to get business unit leaders engaged so that they provide meaningful projects that startups can work on. This means persuading them about the potential benefits of collaborating with startups, as well as aligning startup engagement outcomes with their KPIs. Business unit leaders’ enthusiastic involvement can lead to a virtuous cycle vis-à-vis showcasing success stories to convey what is possible. For Patel, it was critical to engage key leaders across the broader Renault/Nissan/Mitsubishi Alliance – for example, Connected Car team leaders – through regular presentations and pitches to the internal Alliance Innovation steering committee. As opportunities emerged for startups in Infiniti Lab to work on POCs, time was allocated from the existing business transformation team to support POCs. Within two years of the program’s inception a dedicated team was put in place to enable accelerator alumni to progress within the business, without their idea and entrepreneurial spirit “being killed”.

Enthusing roving ambassadors. It is vital to mitigate the lack of awareness about startup engagement among the corporation’s employees, to reduce the odds that informal queries posed to employees, including junior and middle managers, are not met with ignorance. Better still, it would be useful to have some of them become active informal supporters of the initiative. At INFINITI LAB, Patel paid attention to internal employee communication by featuring stories within existing internal newsletters. Additionally, the company President’s regular presentations at employee town halls ensured every employee was given a base line of information about the initiative, including its objectives and success stories. Importantly, many employees were invited to join the INFINITI LAB as mentors by staging a “speed dating” session at the launch of each program where mentors were matched to appropriate startups. Some of them also took part in a one-off Intrapreneur program, under the INFINITI LAB umbrella.

To conclude, as corporations are increasingly opening up their innovation activity to engage with a variety of ecosystem partners – including startups – they must recognize that the enormous effort that goes into creating external interfaces with startups is, in some sense, just the tip of the iceberg. As much, if not more, effort needs to happen inside the organization, effort which is often invisible to the external world.

Shameen Prashantham is Associate Professor of International Business and Strategy at China Europe International Business School. His research primarily focuses on what he calls “dancing with gorillas” – partnering between large corporations and startups.

Sheelpa Patel is Managing Director of Mavens & Mavericks Ltd., a marketing and business development consultancy, specializing in corporate/startup collaborations and innovation programs.

The article first appeared in the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU).

Author
Shameen Prashantham; Sheelpa Patel
Description

Owing to a lack of actual meaningful collaboration, startup initiatives are often met with skepticism and dismissed as mere PR exercises or “innovation theatre”. 

Faculty Name
Media
组织机构

CSR Focus and a Look Ahead as CEIBS 25th Anniversary Celebration Begins

Submitted by admin on Sat, 04/13/2019 - 21:41
Department
Article Description

April 13, 2019. Beijing & Shanghai — With an electronic laser light show to get the evening started and an impressive tech-inspired button push to end the night, China Europe International Business School (CEIBS) today launched the China leg of its 25th Anniversary Celebration with parallel ceremonies in both Beijing and Shanghai. The launch followed an alumni-led CSR forum in the capital, and throughout the entire day there was a recurring theme of CEIBS’ role in educating business leaders who go beyond financial success to achieve global significance.

Categories
Exclude from all News Lists
Off
Exclude from the Main News List
Off
Is Faculty Awards
Off
Translate redirect
node/2997

Lessons from China’s Lucrative Wealth Management Industry

Submitted by admin on Fri, 04/12/2019 - 16:25

By Lu Xiaohui
Founder & CEO of Loyal Wealth Management, CEIBS FMBA alumnus

China’s wealth management market is massive! The latest estimates are that, in 2018, there were almost 1.7 million customers with over RMB 10 million ($ 1.48 million US dollars) in assets. As CEO of Loyal Wealth Management, I’ve seen the sector grow, and our company with it. Over the last nine years, I’ve learned some fundamental lessons about what it takes to provide high-quality, reliable service to our clientele. These can easily be applied to many other companies and industries.

  1. Do what you do best
  2. Reliability is key
  3. Respect the customer

For item 1, we are clear on what we have to offer. We are a wealth management company, we are not asset managers. Many people are still confused about the relationship between asset management and wealth management. In asset management, you make investments according to your preferences concerning earnings and risks. Customers invest in you if they are convinced your products are in line with their needs. An asset management company just has to mind its own business, make investments, and compete in the market based on the rate of return.

The wealth management company, on the other hand, manages customers, instead of money. It helps its clients make the best financial plans to suit their needs. For instance, it offers advice on issues such as what percentage of assets to invest in fixed-income products, secondary-market products or equities, how much insurance premium to pay annually, and how much insurance coverage to get. This is what wealth management companies do. This is what we do best.

We started off as an investment company. But in order to ensure sustainable development of the company, wealth management has become our main business. Because our focus is on helping our clients manage and grow their wealth, products that have met the risk control requirements of other companies still have to go through another round of assessment by our risk control committee before they are finally approved. Since we started the wealth management business in 2009, followed by opening our first outlet in 2010, we’ve never broken a contract for any fixed-income product.

This brings me to the second point, reliability.

Our slogan is: To be the most reliable family wealth manager. Why? We stay close to our customers. As a “wealth manager”, we not only manage wealth, we also take care of many other things, especially financial matters that customers don’t know much about. Being reliable is our priority. We are unequivocal on this positioning. Boasting that you are competent means nothing to customers. You will be measured by your actions and results.

You will also be measured by the way in which you treat your clients. And that’s my third point: respect the customer. When working at previous financial institutions, I noticed that many financial managers had no respect for customers. They didn’t view each customer as a person, or help him with wealth management out of respect for his wealth. They simply treated the customer as a performance indicator. Customers will feel the difference, and they will not remain with you for long is you treat them as targets to achieve on your way to your annual bonus. Respect for customers is also tied to the wider issue of living up to your responsibility as a member of your company’s team. Simply finishing your work at the end of the day is far from enough. You have to be responsible for everything you do. This is something we believe in very strongly.

Over the last decade, we have provided excellent service through our 11 locations in 18 key communities within Shanghai. Our goal is to expand the business to a little more than 100 outlets in total. We want to be in all the major international communities in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Suzhou, Hangzhou, and maybe Chengdu or Xi’an. We plan to open 18 outlets in Shanghai, about the same number in Beijing, and probably more outlets in Shenzhen.

But more importantly, we want to be a reliable family wealth manager in the real sense. We won’t stop at selling products. We are committed to wealth management by providing customers with long-term comprehensive services.

The three factors listed above are our building blocks to accomplishing our goals. I hope they can also be useful to you in meeting yours.  

Author
Xiaohui Lu
Description

China’s wealth management market is massive! The latest estimates are that, in 2018, there were almost 1.7 million customers with over RMB 10 million ($ 1.48 million US dollars) in assets.

组织机构
Subscribe to