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Tuesday, November 28, 2017

2nd Annual CEIBS OB/HR Symposium: The Good, the Bad, and the Dynamic: Re-examining the Leader-Follower Relationship

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2nd Annual CEIBS OB/HR Symposium
The Good, the Bad, and the Dynamic :
Re-examining the Leader-Follower Relationship

The OB/HR CEIBS Symposium is intended to be a forum for academics to discuss their newest research in organizational behavior and human resource management topics. This year we will gain insight into both the positive and negative ways that leaders can impact followers as well as the ways that followers and leaders jointly define this relationship.

Presenters are individuals who are on the cutting-edge of research in our field and whose work represents creative and high-quality scholarship. We strive to keep the conference numbers small and provide an intimate setting to foster collaborative ties and a supportive atmosphere.

There is no registration fee for this symposium. However, attendance is limited to 100 people due to space restrictions. Preference will be given to faculty for this symposium and then on a first come first served basis at the following website:

Online Registration

Date: November 28, 2017

Time: The symposium will begin with registration at 8:30 a.m. and finish at 5:30 p.m.

Schedule:

8:30 a.m.

Registration and Breakfast

9:00-9:10 a.m.

Welcome
Li, Mingjun, President
Jean Lee, Chair of OB/HR Department​

9:10-10:50 a.m.

 

 

The Dynamic: Negotiating Relationships Over Time
Chair: Emily David (CEIBS)
Mary Uhl-Bien (Texas Christian University)

Reversing the Lens in Leadership: Viewing Leadership and Followership as a Co-Creation
Crystal Farh (University of Washington)
Dynamic Leadership Emergence in Creative Project Teams: Implications of Contribution Content, Timing, and Peer Context
Discussant: Gilad Chen (University of Maryland)

10:50-11:05 a.m.

Break

11:05-12:45 p.m.

The Good: Motivating and Empowering Employees
Chair: Byron Lee (CEIBS)
Gilad Chen (University of Maryland)

Multiple Team Membership and Empowerment Spillover Effects: Can Empowerment Processes Cross Team Boundaries
An-Chih (Andrew) Wang (National Sun Yat-sen University)
Selflessness, virtuocracy, and leader development in Taobao villages in rural China
Discussant: Jiang Yuan (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

12:45-2:15 p.m.

Lunch

2:15-4:00 p.m.

The Bad: Follower Responses to Abusive Supervision
Chair: Sebastian Schuh (CEIBS)
Huiwen Lian (University of Kentucky)

When and Why Helping Leads to Abusive Supervision?
Nai-Wen Chi (National Sun Yat-Sen University)
Understanding When and Why Leader Negative Emotional Expressions Increase Follower Performance and Upward Voice: The Emotions-As-Social Information Perspective
Jack Chiang (Peking University)
Does Loving Self Mean Exploiting Others? Narcissism in Ethical Decision-Making Processes
Discussant: Crystal Farh (University of Washington)

4:00-4:15 p.m.

Break

4:15-5:30 p.m.

Workshops: 

 

 

Moderator(s)

Expert

1

The Good Larry Farh Gilad Chen
An-Chih (Andrew) Wang

2

The Bad Han Jian Huiwen Lian
Nai-Wen Chi
Jack Chiang

3

The Dynamic Michelle Zheng Mary Uhl-Bien
Crystal Farh

Location: CEIBS Shanghai Campus - 699, Hongfeng Road, Shanghai, 201206

Hotel: We have reserved a limited number of rooms on the CEIBS campus at a reduced rate for symposium attendees. Please contact Grace Chen for more information and reservations.

Contacts: If you have any questions please contact Grace Chen (Email: cgrace2@ceibs.edu, Tel: +86 21 28905056) or Emily David (edavid@ceibs.edu)

WORKSHOPS
The purpose of the workshops in the symposium is to facilitate networking between participants with common interests, to identify potential avenues for future research, and to facilitate collaborative research. The aim is to have an open discussion in order to identify frontiers for future research within the scope of the theme of the group. Each group will have a facilitator and experts from the earlier sessions. All participants will get the opportunity to introduce their interests and structure the subsequent discussion. Experts will provide comments on the emergent ideas and will help identify common themes and challenges in the area.

Presentation 1

Title

Reversing the Lens in Leadership: Viewing Leadership and Followership as a Co-Creation

Presenter

Mary Uhl-Bien

Abstract Shamir (2007) helped us to see that even follower-centric research has been heavily biased toward the leader and that we need to “reverse the lens” in leadership to focus on followers and relationships. In this presentation, I will show how reversing the lens allows us to see the leader-follower relationship in new light. Using process models, I will position followership in the leadership construct, and illustrate four different ways of viewing the follower in leadership research: position-based, role-based, behavioral (process) view, and identity view. I will conclude by highlighting new avenues for research and identifying exciting new opportunities and possibilities for leadership and followership research.

Presentation 2

Title

Dynamic Leadership Emergence in Creative Project Teams: Implications of Contribution Content, Timing, and Peer Context

Presenter

Crystal Farh

Abstract

Integrating functional leadership theory with models of the team creative process, I will present a dynamic model of leadership emergence in creative teams in which leadership emergence is shaped by a) the type of contributions members express during the creative process (constructive contributions proposing new ideas, or supportive contributions affirming ideas with merit), b) when those contributions are expressed in the creative life cycle of the team (i.e., in the generation or implementation phase), and c) the extent fellow teammates themselves are contributing in constructive or supportive ways. We tested our theoretical model in two studies involving simulated creative teams engaged in product design and implementation. In both studies, we found that constructive contributions were more strongly related to leadership emergence in the generation phase than in the implementation phase. Moreover, the impact of constructive contributions on leadership emergence in the generation phase was stronger when fellow teammates’ constructive contributions were low. Surprisingly, in both studies, we found consistent evidence that supportive contributions enhanced leadership emergence in the generation phase, while the findings on supportive contributions and leadership emergence in the implementation phase was mixed. Overall, our model highlights the importance of integrating dynamic and contextualized aspects of teams into theories of leadership emergence and also sheds new light on the processes underlying emergent forms of leadership in creative teams.

Presentation 3

Title

Multiple Team Membership and Empowerment Spillover Effects: Can Empowerment Processes Cross Team Boundaries?

Presenter

Gilad Chen

Abstract

In today’s organizations, employees are often assigned as members of multiple teams simultaneously (i.e., multiple team membership), and yet we know little about important leadership and employee phenomena in such settings. In this talk, I will describe both a scenario-based experiment and a field study of leaders and their employees, designed to examine how empowering leadership exhibited by two different team leaders toward a single employee working on two different teams can spillover to affect that employee’s psychological empowerment and subsequent proactivity across the teams. In both studies, findings indicated that each of the team leaders’ empowering leadership uniquely and positively influenced an employee’s psychological empowerment and subsequent proactive behaviors. In the field study, results showed further that empowering leadership exhibited by one team leader influenced the psychological empowerment and proactive behaviors of his/her team member not only in that leader’s team but also the other team outside of that leader’s stewardship. Finally, in both studies, empowering leadership exhibited in one team was shown to substitute for lower levels of empowering leadership experienced in a different team. I will conclude the talk with discussion of implications to the motivation, teams, and leadership literatures, as well as practical guidance for leaders charged with managing employees that have multiple team memberships.

Presentation 4

Title

Selflessness, virtuocracy, and leader development in Taobao villages in rural China

Presenter

An-Chih (Andrew) Wang

Abstract

We investigate the intergroup leadership phenomenon in “Taobao villages,” or clusters of rural entrepreneurs who open at least 100 online shops on Taobao Marketplace within a single town and create an annual transaction volume of at least RMB 10 million. Using multi-source qualitative data, we build a model that explains how a person without knowledge, skill, prior experience, and/or competition advantage is able to develop, secure, and perpetuate his or her leadership role. Our analysis suggests that during every phase of the development of Taobao villages (i.e., birth, expansion, and renewal), conflicts among villagers urge the bellwethers to reflect on the meaning of becoming rural entrepreneurs, and the lesson learned from such reflection leads to the bellwethers’ selfless reactions, such as sharing key information, creating mutual resources, and facilitating the integration of villagers. These selfless behaviors gradually form and reinforce the bellwethers’ selfless identity, whereas make other villagers to grant the selfless leader identity to the bellwethers and claim a follower identity that strengthens the bellwethers’ leader status. The proposed model thus vividly presents a selflessness-based virtuocracy system that is valued in the ancient Chinese traditions but rarely understood in the current leadership literature.

Presentation 5

Title

When and Why Helping Leads to Abusive Supervision?

Presenter

Huiwen Lian

Abstract

Accumulating evidence has shown that subordinates’ undesirable behaviors such as poor performance or deviance can result in abusive supervision. Such evidence suggests that subordinates’ desirable behaviors such as offering help should discourage abusive supervision. However, empirical evidence has failed to show that offering help towards supervisors predicted abusive supervision. In this talk, I will present the results from multiple studies that have explored the relation between subordinates’ helping behaviors and abusive supervision. Building on the victimization model and the hierarchy literature, I argue and found that supervisor-directed help increased supervisors’ sense of power and tendency to abuse power by engaging in abusive supervision when supervisors held high power distance values. These findings advance our knowledge on why supervisors abuse subordinates and thus provide important managerial implications for organizations to reduce abusive supervision.

Presentation 6

Title

Understanding When and Why Leader Negative Emotional Expressions Increase Follower Performance and Upward Voice: The Emotions-As-Social Information Perspective

Presenter

Nai-Wen Chi

Abstract

Leaders may use negative emotional displays to influence the followers through their facial, vocal, and other nonverbal expressions during the leader-follower interactions, which become important social cues that influence how followers feel, think, and act towards the leaders. Based on the Emotions as Social Information (EASI) model, I will present two of my recent papers that explored when and why leaders’ negative emotional expressions can increase employee performance (Paper 1) and upward voice (Paper 2). In Paper 1, the results show that leader negative emotional expressions can improve follower performance when followers are conscientious and agreeable. However, when follower power distance orientation and perceived leader power are both high, this relationship becomes negative. In Paper 2, the results indicated that leader negative emotional expressions facilitate followers’ upward voice when employees are low in power distance orientation, proactive personality, and perceived organizational politics. Finally, employees’ inferences about potential problems and disliking of the leaders is differentially explained by moderating effects.

Presentation 7

Title

Does Loving Self Mean Exploiting Others? Narcissism in Ethical Decision-Making Processes

Presenter

Jack Chiang

Abstract

The paper examines whether high narcissistic individuals are more likely to treat others harshly. A survey study involved 224 civil judges in Mainland China supported our hypotheses. Our results suggested that high narcissistic judges were harsher to the defendants in their judgment than low narcissistic judges were. Adopting a trait activation framework, we further investigated under which circumstances narcissism can be activated to affect the narcissists’ ethical decision-making process. Self-regulatory resources were proposed and found to be a crucial contingency, such that when high narcissistic judges were deleted in their self-regulatory resources, they became harsh to the defendants. Finally, I will discuss the theoretical contribution and managerial implications of the paper.

Dr. Gilad Chen is the Robert H. Smith Chair in Organizational Behavior, at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business. He received his bachelor degree in Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University in 1996, and his doctoral degree in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from George Mason University in 2001. Prior to joining the Smith School, Dr. Chen was on the faculty at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Texas A&M University.  He has also visited and taught at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Singapore Management University, Technion, and Tel-Aviv University.

Dr. Chen teaches courses on a variety of organizational behavior, human resource management, and methodological topics. His research focuses on work motivation, adaptation, teams and leadership, with particular interest in understanding the complex interface between individuals and the socio-technical organizational context. He has won several research awards, including the 2007 Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the 2008 Cummings Scholar Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management, and the 2014 Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Award from the University of Maryland. Dr. Chen is also an elected Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, Society of Industrial-Organizational Psychology, and Society of Organizational Behavior.

Dr. Chen’s research has appeared in such journals as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Personnel Psychology, Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, and Research in Organizational Behavior. He is now serving as the Editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology (2014-2020), after serving as Associate Editor for the journal from 2008 through 2013. He has also been serving as an editorial board member of the Academy of Management Journal and the Academy of Management Review.


Dr. Mary Uhl-Bien is the BNSF Railway Endowed Professor of Leadership in the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University (TCU). She is also a Fellow at the Lancaster Leadership Centre in Lancaster, England and has been a Visiting Scholar in Australia, Sweden, Portugal and Spain. Dr. Uhl-Bien's research focuses on complexity leadership, relational leadership, and followership, and has appeared in such journals as Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, and The Leadership Quarterly. Her research has been funded with grants from organizations such as Booz Allen Hamilton, and she has conducted research in partnership with Lockheed Martin, Bank of America, Disney, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Stryker. Her work on complexity leadership theory and followership theory has been recognized with Best Paper awards. She is a founder of the Network of Leadership Scholars (NLS) in the Academy of Management, and served as Representative-at-Large and Division Chair for the Organizational Behavior (OB) Division in the Academy. She is active in executive education nationally and internationally, teaching for the Brookings Institute, the Gallup Organization, and universities in the U.S., Canada, Australia and Europe.


Dr. Huiwen Lian is an Associate Professor of management in Gatton School of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky. Prior to joining Gatton, Dr. Lian was an Associate Professor of management in the School of Business at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She received her Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of Waterloo. Her research focuses on leadership, motivation, and workplace deviance. She currently serves on the editorial board of Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology. Her work has been published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Annals, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Personnel Psychology, among others.


An-Chih (Andrew) Wang (PhD, National Taiwan University) is an Associate Professor with Distinguished Junior Research Professorship at National Sun Yat-sen University (NSYSU), and will soon joins CEIBS in January, 2018. His research interests focus on Chinese leadership styles, Western leadership theories and their cultural boundaries, gender and leadership, as well as organizational behavior in the Chinese context. His research has appeared in top-tier journals, such as the Academy of Management Journal, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Leadership Quarterly, and Human Relations. In 2014, he received the Ta-You Wu Memorial Award from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan for his research concentration on building indigenous Chinese leadership theories. He also He received the Best Paper with International Implication Award from the Organization Behavior Division, Academy of Management in 2017.


Dr. Crystal Farh is an Assistant Professor of Management and Organization at the University of Washington. She previously served on the faculty of the Broad College of Business at the Michigan State University. Crystal earned her B.A. in Psychology from Harvard College and her Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from the School of Business at the University of Maryland. Dr. Farh's research focuses on employee voice, teams and leadership, abusive supervision, and managing cross-cultural interfaces. Her research has been published in the Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, and Journal of Applied Psychology. In recognition of her research contributions, Dr. Farh received the Frank T. Paine Doctoral Award for Academic Achievement (2011) at the University of Maryland, the S. Rains Wallace Dissertation Award (2014) from the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology, and the Western Academy of Management’s Ascendant Scholar Award (2017). Dr. Farh has served on the editorial boards of the Academy Management Journal and Journal of Applied Psychology since 2014 and teaches MBA-level courses in leadership and management at University of Washington.


Dr. Jack Chiang is an Assistant Professor of Management at the Guanghua School of Management, Peking University. He received his Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior at the Michael G. Foster School of Business, University of Washington. Dr. Chiang's work explores how paternalistic leaders exert their authoritarian, benevolent, and moral influences to achieve higher levels of motivation and performance with followers. He is also examining how leaders’ narcissistic personality impacts their organizations, teams, and followers. His work has been published in journals such as Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, and Journal of Management. Dr. Chiang currently teaches international & Chinese MBA courses, Ph.D. seminars, and undergraduate courses at Guanghua. He previously won two star teacher awards at the University of Washington. In addition to his research and teaching experiences, Dr. Chiang worked on talent reviews, leadership development, and recruiting at the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) before his doctoral study. He also had consulting experience with companies such as Applied Materials, Hainan Capital, Japan Airlines, Shanghai Commercial & Savings Bank, and Mengniu Dairy.


Dr. Nai-Wen Chi is Professor and the Director of the Institute of Human Resource Management at National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan. His primary research focuses on emotional labor, moods at work, group affect, and employee attitudes and behaviors. His work has been published in Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, and other outlets.


If you have any questions please contact Grace Chen (Email: cgrace2@ceibs.edu, Tel: +86 21 28905056) or Emily David (edavid@ceibs.edu)